The story of Quadradius

Quadradius pieces ready to march forward.
Quadradius is an intricate and competitive game of skill, chance, bluffing, and devastation. It is a turn-based board game played by 1 to 6 people on a three dimensional grid. The goal is to eliminate all of your opponent's pieces from the arena. This can be accomplished by jumping on their pieces and smashing them one by one.

But this would get boring quite quickly, so to put a bionic twist on things, each piece can collect Power Orbs scattered throughout the arena. These orbs contain one of over 30 versatile powers that can be unleashed to attack, defend, foil your opponent's plans, or combined together for even greater devastating effects. Dubbed "3D Space Checkers on Crack" by the community, Quadradius will have you amazed at the rewarding victories, fumbling losses, and the wondrous complexities you continue to unravel.

Ready to experience Quadradius? Click here to play now.



"Squares" was the precursor to Quadradius way back in 1995.
"Squares" was the precursor to Quadradius way back in 1995.
Quadradius began its life in an entirely different century and under an entirely different name. It was the mid-90's and, as a high school programming class assignment, Jimmi Heiserman created a game called "Squares". Squares, despite possibly being the dullest name for a video game ever, was a smashing success with Jimmi's 5 friends. In it, many of the building blocks of what would eventually become Quadradius were already in place (albeit in some eye-burning shade of magenta or cyan).

Built in Actionscript 2, "Classic" Quadradius had a grittier, darker feel, and required 2 players.
Built in Actionscript 2, "Classic" Quadradius had a grittier, darker feel, and required 2 players.
Fast forward a good handful of years to the early 21st century. The internet had become a thing that people used, Jimmi had earned a real degree in computer engineering and his friend Brad Kayal was an art school graduate who somehow landed a real job in design and advertising. It was at this time Jimmi decided to reinvent "Squares" as a 2-player internet game and asked Brad to help with the art for just a few weeks. Nearly a year later, the original Quadradius was born.

Post-launch, Quadradius went on to win various independent gaming awards, cash-money and a trophy from the Independent Games Festival, ranked in the top 5 games at SXSW Interactive 2008, praised by gaming blogs, discovered and evangelized by industry-leading game designer Richard Garfield, written about in quaint print-based media such as The Boston Globe, and shared on the homepages of sites like Newgrounds, Jay Is Games and Penny Arcade (which promptly crashed the Quadradius server).

The newest iteration of Quadradius, with its polished, carbon-fiber shell.
The newest iteration of Quadradius, with its polished, carbon-fiber shell.
All this attention taught Jimmi and Brad a lot about the world of video games. Mainly that they really didn't know what they were doing. This realization eventually lead to the development of an entirely NEW version of Quadradius, built from the ground up with a real game server engine, many new ways to play (from single player to 6 player, team battles, and custom arenas) and vastly improved code, UX, and graphics. To help with this, Kahil Jallad joined the team as a front end and back end Rails and database developer while Jimmi tackled the game play logic and game server code and Brad redesigned everything. After multiple spurts and phases of work over the years the new Quadradius is now live and Jimmi, Brad, and Kahil continue to code new features, improve existing ones, and add new art to make this the best "3D space checkers" ever invented.

We have employed a plethora of technologies and skills to bring the Quadradius experience direct to your computer; from client side to server side; from editors to applications; from hardware to software.

The actual game arena and many animations you play with, along with the lobby you smack talk in, are all programmed in a game-developer-friendly language called Actionscript 3 using FlashDevelop as the editor and Flash CS6 as the asset builder. Many additional animations and “tweening” effects were pulled off using GSAP 12 (GreenSock Animation Platform). The game's network and logic server is programmed in Java 1.7 with NetBeans 7 as the editor, and is built on top of the SmartFoxServer 2X Multiplayer Platform. The HTML portion of the website that houses the game is constructed with Ruby on Rails, and the backend database storage is a MySQL instance.

A variety of coding languages and graphic tools were used to develop Quadradius.
A variety of coding languages and graphic tools were used to develop Quadradius.
The large majority of the graphics for the new Quadradius were completed using Photoshop and Illustrator with a huge shift to bitmap images (compared to vector-based art of the original Quadradius). Animations not done in code, mainly png sequences, were completed using both Photoshop and After Effects. Sound design and mixing was done using Reaper as the main DAW (Digital Audio Workstation), Adobe Premiere to test-sync sound with animation, and Audacity for smaller tweaks.

There are also many helper tools that our small team has utilized for this endeavor. Source code version control was done using our SVN server, along with Tortoise SVN as our preferred client. Vizzy Flash Tracer was a lifesaver when it came to debugging client side Actionscript, while Charles Web Debugging Proxy was used to avoid caching problems during development, simulate download speeds, and debug http calls. Programmer's Notepad was used for some manual html editing/tweaking. Finally, PuTTY and Filezilla both came in handy when fighting with our servers.

Windows, Mac, and Unix operating systems were all used in the construction and deployment of the Quadradius Experience. While many browsers were used to test compatibility, all 3 of us rely on Chrome as our personal favorite.

Any questions about game development, programming, or graphic design? Shoot us an email at team@quadradius.com.

Jimmi working on Quadradius with his laptop.
Jimmi working on Quadradius with his laptop.
Jimmi Heiserman, the creator of Quadradius, is a Boston-based freelance Flash Actionscript developer. He designed the game-play mechanics of Quadradius, programmed the front end of the game using Actionscript 3, and also developed the backend game server using Java.

Jimmi drinking bartenders-choice Sake in Tokyo.
Jimmi drinking bartenders-choice Sake in Tokyo.
While he has been a paid developer since 2004, he has been programming since childhood while growing up in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He started with poorly self-taught BASIC and made games that only his friends and family ever got to play. Years later, he took Pascal programming in high school and continued to focus on game development. By the time he was in college in Philadelphia at Drexel University, he was deeply immersed in Object Oriented Programming (OOP) languages; specifically C++ and Java. Also during this time, he discovered Actionscript!

He currently enjoys riding his bike around Boston (in the rain), wine with friends, cocktails with experienced bartenders, co-working at home and abroad, and of course working as a game and web freelance developer. Quite friendly, if you see him around the city, say hi!

Contact: jimmi@quadradius.com

Brad Kayal at some fancy event we suppose.
Brad Kayal at some fancy event we suppose.
Brad Kayal is the Quadradius designer. What this generally means is he gets yelled at when the graphics, sounds, or animations he meticulously crafts (pulling from years of schooling and real-world experience) don't fit Jimmi's code. Brad lives in San Francisco and works a day-shift as an art director in advertising and has done work with a huge list of name-droppable clients such as Google, Volkswagen, Audi, Cadillac, Intel, eBay, Truth, ESPN, and Timberland and can be found bragging about his awards from non-name-droppable industry-insider institutions such as Cannes, Clio, D&AD, Communication Arts, and Print Magazine.

Brad banging on some drums.
Brad banging on some drums.
Brad met Jimmi back in high school in Pennsylvania while attending various local punk shows. Shortly thereafter, Brad went to school for graphic design with a concentration in interactive design at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Three days after graduating (and three days after telling himself that he'd never work in advertising), Brad moved to Boston to start work in advertising. After 9 years of working in Boston advertising, Brad moved to San Francisco to experience advertising in a place where it doesn't snow.

During all these years, Brad continued to work on Quadradius with Jimmi along with other projects including poster design, photography, and filling his apartment with things you'd find in a dead relative's attic.

You can see the majority of Brad's work at his website: BradKayal.com

Contact: brad@quadradius.com


Kahil drinking and playing Quadradius
Kahil deciding whether to drink or play Quadradius
The latest addition to the Quadradius team, Kahil is a humble plumber of the internets by day whose secret alter ego is . . . a humble plumber of the internets, for Quadradius.

Kahil is a lifetime gamer geek from Rockland County, New York, who once beat Steve Jackson at OGRE. When not perusing the works of Boethius or polishing his shiny gold tooth, he enjoys trying to keep his Elo score over 1500.

Contact: kahil@quadradius.com

Jimmi would like to thank:
  • Steven Rys, for his hundred of hours of play testing and reporting, and thousands of hours of actual play time over the years with Classic Quadradius. He definitely knows his way around the arena, as he has logged over 5,000 games in our old version.
  • Pat Kemp, for his early dev support and letting me crash on his couch in Seattle for weeks while we fantasized about being professional game designers, which he has now become: PatKemp.com.
  • Josh Csehak, for designing some sequenced animations for the game using his After Effects skills. He also is a professional videographer and director. His cinematic work can be seen at MagicGoggles.com
  • Fusun Tufanyazici, for her having to deal with months and months of me toiling away on “some side project”. But as she saw the game take shape, she became one of the biggest advocates for me to keep pushing forward. Her excitement for the release of Quadradius was reassuringly contagious.
  • grammy-jean-heiserman-with-jimmi-heiserman-and-fusun-tufanyazici-on-porch.jpg
    Grammy Heiserman enjoying summer at our annual All-Day Super-Picnic known as Slaskifest.
  • Grammy (Jean) Heiserman, for the on and off years of sheltering me while I went to elementary school, middle school, high school, college, and every return trip back home after I moved away. It was in her house, in one tiny 8'x8' bedroom that I developed both the '95 version of this game in high school and the Classic Quadradius version that was played for so many years. She got to see it as it progressed. I went back home to say hello, then goodbye, as she died in June of 2013 in that same house, about fifty days before this version was released. If I could show this game to her now, she would say “Jimmi, I don't know how to play this. Why don't you get a real job and make some money for yourself? You want a sandwich?”

Brad would like to thank:
  • All the various friends and co-workers forced to beta test the game over the past year. You really did help make everything better.
  • Jeremy Knight for listening to endless tirades about payment methods, micro-transactions, and the pros and cons of FLV's vs PNG sequences (when all he really wanted to do was enjoy a beer with his wife).

Kahil would like to thank:
  • Jimmi and Brad for putting together such a great game, bringing me on as part of the team, and being such great guys to work with.
  • I_Am_So_Awesome for proving JGGIFT

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